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Ear, Nose & Throat

Ear, Nose & Throat services include surgeries for tubes and tonsils, sinus and nasal polyps, reconstructions of the eardrum and fractures of facial bones.

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Health Tip

  • Living independently at home is a way of life that many of us take for granted. Memorial Hospital and Health Care Center offers Lifeline, a medical alert assistance service for those who wish to live independently at home.

    For more information, please call
    812-996-2399 or 800-852-7279, ext. 2399.
  • Memorial Hospital's certified fitness instructors rotate fitness classes on a monthly basis to give participants a wider variety of exercise options. Monthly memberships are available for $35 ("series" classes are not included). For a monthly calendar of fitness class dates and times, visit our website at www.mhhcc.org and click on "Classes and Events" or call 812-996-2399.

    For more information, please call
    812-996-2399 or 800-852-7279, ext. 2399.
  • A study indicates that people who spend more time being physically active spend more time on this earth. At the National Institutes of Health, Steven Moore looked at life expectancy and physical activity in more than 650,000 people. Moore found those who did only a little still gained a lot:

    "Even a very low level of activity, equivalent to about 10 minutes of walking per day, was associated with a gain of almost two years of life expectancy, regardless of body weight level."

    On the high end in his study, those who did the equivalent of about 45 minutes or more of walking lived about four years longer than those who were not active.

    The study was in the journal PLoS Medicine.
    Source: www.hhs.gov

    For more information, please call
    812-996-2399 or 800-852-7279, ext. 2399.
  • Pregnant women should gain weight, but not too much - especially if they were overweight or obese before pregnancy, because the extra weight they gain may linger after pregnancy. So researchers wanted to see what doctors were telling these women about healthy limits on weight gain. They interviewed 24 overweight or obese women. At Penn State College of Medicine, Dr. Cynthia Chuang says the targets the women reported indicated the doctors were generally too high, if they gave any advice at all:

    "Only 8 percent of the women we interviewed were advised to gain the appropriate amount of weight during their pregnancy."

    Chuang says pregnant women need only to eat 300 more calories a day - not eat for two - and should be physically active.

    The study in the journal Women's Health Issues was supported by the National Institutes of Health.
    Source: www.hhs.gov

    For more information, please call
    812-996-2399 or 800-852-7279, ext. 2399.
  • You don't get days off from diabetes. It has to be managed constantly, and not just by monitoring your blood sugar and taking medication appropriately. At the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Director Griffin Rodgers says a lot of goal-setting is involved. He says there are goals about what you can eat - and, more importantly, can't - whether you are controlling your weight, and whether you are being physically active. "People with diabetes can't take a vacation from diabetes. They need to make decisions to manage their diabetes 24 hours a day, seven days a week." People without diabetes can manage, too. Some of those same lifestyle decisions, such as being active and keeping your weight and eating patterns healthy, can help to prevent diabetes.

    Source: www.hhs.gov
    For more information, please call
    812-996-2399 or 800-852-7279, ext. 2399.
  • Like Mom and Dad, kids may wind up with high blood pressure because of what they eat. Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looked at data on sodium - such as in salt - for about 6,200 8 - to 18-year-olds. Researcher Mary Cogswell:

    "Just making simple choices about the bread and cheese could save up to 400 milligrams of sodium in that bologna and cheese sandwich."

    Something similar happens in adults, and it can raise adults, risks of heart disease and stroke. Cogswell says high sodium levels in kids can set them up for the same problems as they grow older. She says meals out and processed food are where most of the sodium comes from.

    The study is in the journal Pediatrics.
    Source: www.hhs.gov

    For more information, please call
    812-996-2399 or 800-852-7279, ext. 2399.
  • Each day in the United States, approximately 3,800 young people under the age of 18 smoke their first cigarette. An estimated 1,000 youth in that age group become daily cigarette smokers.

    HHS Assistant Secretary for Health Dr. Howard Koh:

    "Each year, more than 444,000 people die prematurely from smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke. That is why HHS launched BeTobaccoFree.gov -- to provide information on avoiding tobacco and ending tobacco use."

    For more information, please call
    812-996-2399 or 800-852-7279, ext. 2399.
  • BeTobaccoFree.gov is a one-stop-shop for the most up-to-date information on the health effects of tobacco, evidence-based methods on how to quit, and more."We know, regardless of age, those who stop smoking and using tobacco can substantially reduce their risk for disease."

    Source: www.hhs.gov

    For more information, please call
    812-996-2399 or 800-852-7279, ext. 2399.

Awards and Accreditation


Memorial Hospital named among top 5% in the nation for outstanding patient experience for the last seven years.
Memorial Hospital named among top 5% in the nation for outstanding patient experience for the last seven years.
2013 and 2014 Women's Choice Awards as an America's Best Hospital for Heart Care and an America's Best Hospital for Obstetrics
2013 and 2014 Women's Choice Awards as an America's Best Hospital for Heart Care and an America's Best Hospital for Obstetrics
Memorial Hospital's Wound Care Center became the first center in Indiana to be certified by The Joint Commission.
Memorial Hospital's Wound Care Center became the first center in Indiana to be certified by The Joint Commission.
See all awards